Amit Tandon Family Tandoncies Review: Physical stiffness bars an otherwise well-written script from being a laughter riot

Amit Tandon Family Tandoncies Review: Physical stiffness bars an otherwise well-written script from being a laughter riot

Most Indians have this innate tendency to become slaves of the fantasies of the white supremacists. An argument is validated only when a white person confirms it to be true. That’s why when we hear about Non-Residential Indians or Indians who have visited other countries, we immediately believe that person to be an achiever. Stepping out from the country zone automatically labels you to be the more successful person. That’s why when Amit Tandon started his act with dialogues such as “I have performed in 23 countries”….” I went to New Zealand”… it felt less like a comedy act and more like a resume being presented to Netflix. While we understand that you might have several jokes about foreigners and their inability to sell the right kind of adventure sports to Indian tourists, there’s a certain mannerism which one needs to follow to start a comic act, and listing out a series of country you have visited, or a number of places you have performed as a comedian is not the starting act of a comedian, rather the starting speech of a person who has gone for an interview at a Multi-National Corporation.

He picks up momentum when he starts talking about the monotonous life of married people, which is quite different from what Bollywood tells us. There’s duty over romance, while you as an audience enjoy that, it seems more to be a well-written script for a content-based film in the Hindi film industry, but the act is not delivered in a manner to make you roll on the floor with laughter.

When he delivers an act about his first fight with his wife, he seems to have borrowed a few thoughts from Kartik Aaryan's character in Pyaar Ka Punchnama, but thankfully he doesn’t end up demonising women for not being as forgetful as men.

Amit Tandon is basically a confused father, a muddled husband who is trying really hard to understand why is he stuck in a generation where they grew up listening to parents, and now in a phase where he has to grow up listening to his children. It's difficult to diss the content and you would want to listen to him intently only to measure if you have a similar kind of mundane life. However, it cannot qualify to be a comedy, but you cannot diss the script either.

But when you imagine other comedians such as Biswa Kalyan Rath delivering the same act, you know that you will laugh out loud. When Biswa arrives on the stage, he allows the audience to laugh at himself. He admits that he will make them all very uncomfortable with his jokes and he will crack more such jokes if you squirm in his presence.

Amit Tandon is a little too stiff in his body language, naturally because he is a 45-year-old sharing relatable jokes about marriage, family and duties as a father. For most of the parts in the show, he holds the microphone in one hand while resting his other arms in the stand, clearly, the posture of a man who is basically exhausted and but has to cater to an audience who expects him to be exuberant.

In the present era, comedy is not only about good scripts, but also requires physical flexibility and ability to deliver an act in a well-performed manner.

Ratings: 2/5 stars

 


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