BADNAAM GALI REVIEW - MAKE SURE YOU VISIT 'BADNAAM GALI'

BADNAAM GALI REVIEW - MAKE SURE YOU VISIT 'BADNAAM GALI'

Production House: Fincca Films Cast: Divyendu Sharma, Patralekha Paul, Dolly Ahluwalia Dialogues: Mohinder Pratap Singh Music: Nakash Aziz and Sargam Jassu Cinematography: Ravi Walia Editing: Satya Sharma Producers: Mayuri Joshi, Prashanth Shetty, Ravi Bhushan, Waseem Amrohi Story: Ravi Bhushan, Shabia Walia Direction: Ashwin Shetty Premiere date: May 10, 2019 Story: Randeep Singh is en route to his aunt's house in Delhi after a minor tussle with his family in Punjab. In quest of some purpose to his life, he lands a job at a garage joint. Meanwhile, Nayanika is the talk of the town in the community where Randeep resides. Nayanika, a surrogate mother by choice and also a fashion designer, is a misunderstood girl in her community. Her neighbours resort to slut-shaming her, but she isn't affected by their slurs much. Randeep, initially hesitant, grows curious about Nayanika's life and the two share a deeper connection over time. How does the community react to their relationship and will Nayanika's problems ever come to an end? Watch the Zee5 original to know more. Artistes’ Performances: The film entirely rides on Divyendu Sharma's shoulders. Despite being a first opportunity to headline a film, he proves he has the capacity to keep the audiences engaged with his antics through an entire narrative. Sadly, Patralekha Paul, his co-star, as Nayanika, is no match to his talent. She looks and dresses like a dream but needs to go a long way in refining her acting mettle. She essays a role that demands a lot of authority and underplayed intensity but Patralekha doesn't seem to understand the space rightly. Dolly Ahluwalia is a complete natural in her scenes and her chemistry with Divyendu is crackling, to say the least. Paritosh Sand, cast in the role of Randeep's father, does a reasonable job in the minimal screen time allotted to him. Technical Merit - Direction: Ashwin Shetty, in his very first outing as a director, delivers an immensely likeable film that's evenly paced and well-written. The director sticks to his focus on eliminating the misconceptions surrounding surrogacy in society and does so with utmost delicacy. One can't call this a realistic film by any means, but the director manages to find the right balance between cinematic liberty and realism. Dialogues: Pratap Singh's lines come with a lot of wit and sarcasm, providing the right backdrop for a story surrounding a social stigma. His lines are flavourful, convey the spirit of a rooted, middle-class society in Delhi with much authenticity. The writer, however, could have been slightly more sensitive in dealing with issues surrounding women's health. Cinematography: Ravi Walia's frames, capturing the fields of Punjab and the urbane dimension of Delhi, make for a lively visual experience for the viewer. Though there's very little scope for the cinematographer to showcase his/her brilliance in this story, Ravi Walia shows that simplicity and sticking to basics is sometimes enough to add value to the frames. Music: Nakash Aziz and Sargam Jassu work on the music score and the only song in the film; it's apparent they aren't here to experiment or try anything out of the box with their effort. The background score in the film sounds jarring and feels like a mix of the leftover soundtrack portions composed for feature films. The musical impact can hardly be felt in a work ridden with cliches. Editing: Satya Sharma, the editor makes the proceedings feel as seamless as possible. There aren't any major loopholes with regard to the flow or continuity. Packaged as a 95-minute film, Badnaam Gali moves at a reasonable pace and tells its story with utmost conviction. Production standards: An aspect that consistently helps the narrative is the maker's decision to stick to outdoor locations over set backdrops. The film, as a result, feels visually rich despite having its own limitations with respect to the production. The story is mounted on a scale that it deserves to have been done and the makers ensure that the technicalities work hand in hand with the plot. Highlights: Story Performance of Divyendu Sharma Comedy quotient Drawbacks: Simplistic resolution of conflict Unwarranted exaggeration about society Analysis: Balancing a topic like surrogacy with subtle humour isn't a space that's easy to deal with, the intentions of Badnaam Gali are strongly complemented by its approach to the sensitive story. Never does the filmmaker make it obvious that Badnaam Gali is another 'issue-based' film. Trying to depict how society turns a blind eye to surrogacy and also showing the hypocrisies of human behaviour, the film serves as a mirror to the conventional mindset of the public, irrespective of the location. However, the attempt to force the romantic angle between the characters portrayed by Divyendu Sharma and Patralekha could have been avoided. There's so much to like about Badnaam Gali with the story, the performances and the subtle treatment, it shows the importance of acceptance and the need for humans to think beyond fragile conventions. Icing on the cake: A heart-warming story about societal acceptance Rating: 3/5


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