BHALOBASHAR SHOHOR REVIEW: NOT EVERYTHING BECOMES ROMANTIC IN SLOW MOTION

BHALOBASHAR SHOHOR REVIEW: NOT EVERYTHING BECOMES ROMANTIC IN SLOW MOTION

In every writer’s life there comes a moment when they look back at their old journals, read their first written stories and find the urge to burn those papers. That is probably something that director Indranil Roychowdhury would do, if years later he gains enough life experiences to scribe a realistic love story. Bhalobashar Shohor, is a collection of four different love stories, which take place in the city of Kolkata. Much like the way Woody Allen expresses his love for Paris in his films, director Indranil Roychowdhury expresses his love for Kolkata in each of his frames. Except, unlike Woody Allen, he spoils it all with outdated melodrama, dramatic monologue and sexism. These techniques may have worked when people first started experiencing cinema, but now such ‘art forms’ result deserves major trolling. It’s 2019, and India has already witnessed the rise of Me Too movement, Aamir Khan has apologised for his participation in the song, ‘Khambe Jaisi Khari Hai,’, Shah Rukh Khan admitted that he would never allow his daughter to be with someone like Rahul, Shahid Kapoor’s glorification of toxic machoism in Kabir Singh was heavily bashed by several critics. This isn’t the 80s and the 90s anymore where one could insult women and get away with it. How long will it take for Indranil Roychowdhury to imbibe this new change that the Indian film industry is going through? Every episode looked like the work of a five-year-old, who has just started enjoying Hollywood romantic films. (Or wait, even they can do better). The first short film Paramount is based on the 2012 movie ‘The Vow’, starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum. There is nothing about the web series that keeps us on the edge to know more because nothing about their performances look convincing and real. The performances seemed rehearsed (and not real), and none of the cast members seemed comfortable to act in front of the camera. The dialogues seemed like the words of an amateur writer, hoping to get laid with his cheesy pick-up lines. You can fast forward each of the episodes because, you secretly know that there is no heart touching cinematic moments. The very title of the series, Bhalobashar Shohor, is so mundane that you are instantly reminded of the time when Bengali film industry made low-budget films, with pathetic editing and framing, just to keep the industry alive. Even in these fast forward moments, the 39-40 minutes film appear to be slow. Star Ratings: 1 / 5    


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