Bonyo Premer Golpo review: Another love story that scares you

Bonyo Premer Golpo review: Another love story that scares you

It’s ironic and completely co-incidental that Bonyo Premer Golpo released on a day when Bollywood superstar Kangana Ranaut vocally called out lawyer Indira Jaysingh for sympathising with the Nirbhaya rapists. “She should be kept in jail with the convicts,” said Kangana Ranaut at a press meet of Panga in Bombay. Her co-actor Richa Chadha who is known for having a different political orientation kept her silence, while some netizens felt that she was fuming with anger.

At a time when there has been an upsurge in the number of rape incidents in the world, a certain section of people has been heavily criticised for trying to sympathise with rapists, terrorists, murderers. Under such circumstances Bonyo Premer Golpo manages to show us various perspectives simultaneously keep us updated on what’s morally wrong and correct.

Mrinalini Sinha Roy or Mini played by Tanushree Chakroborty is a sociologist who regularly visits the correctional home to talk to men accused of rape, murder. She interacts with criminals to understand the mindset of the criminals and study under what kind of circumstances heinous crimes take place in the first place. Her motive is not to sympathise with them but to study them as a subject and do her bit as a sociologist to control the rape problem.

The series begin with three criminals who are on the run and one of them have left a sexually explicit love letter for Mini. The police officer Subroto played by Saheb Bhattacharya learns that during the investigation and secretly suspects Mini in playing a vital role in planning their escape. Another part of Subroto also sees her as a probable victim.

Mini’s boyfriend Joy wants to be supportive but his rage comes in the way and he urges his girlfriend to choose a different path of career, different route of the problem of victim shaming which happens probably unknowingly. Hampering a girl’s career acts like the best kind of security, rather than conducting a more rigorous search for the criminals. Although Mini has been given the police protection she faces a lot of conflicts from her mother, boyfriend, who urge her to do a regular job as an academician whose job doesn’t come with a lot of criminal cases. Even amidst such tensions, where her own security has been under risk, her mind seems to be occupied with work, and by extension, all she thinks about are Kanai, Gaurav and Shafiq, the three criminals and how despite visiting them quite often, she was unable to figure out that they were planning an escape all this time. Tanushree in her own ways managed to reflect well, the thoughts of a working woman. Ideally, we are advised to keep our professional and personal life aside, but there are times when it gets difficult. Especially, when people from your professional life act like a threat to your security.

In fact Mini is so obsessed with thoughts of her security that she is unable to understand that her boyfriend is jealous because of her distant friendship with the police officer, Subroto, who also takes this case personally since he too has started developing affections for her.

There are excellent shots of the railway station which capturing the vanishing point, parallel lines, and perhaps the makers of the film would get a bit annoyed at such intricate details of frame studying, but what’s the purpose of the film studies subject if not to see beyond what’s shown to the normal eyes.

The minimum action sequences such as running at a construction site, sometimes do not synchronise with the background score. But you manage to ignore it all since the characters in the content are all engaged in major gripping moments and situations which would make you want to ignore some of the minor errors.

The editing has been done a bit too rapidly. Before one sequence of a conversation ends, another sequence begins and it partially gets impatient to connect and remember exactly where the last conversation in this sequence ended. On various technical places, Bonyo Premer Golpo requires a bit of guidance, however, the overall attempt has been satisfying.

Women here of all strata happen to be the victims of their choices. If they choose not to get raped, they end up being killed alongside the body of their husband. If women choose to have an extra-marital affair she ends up being a victim of domestic abuse, and if a woman chooses to study sociology and find a remedy for such issues, she too ends up getting blamed for not choosing a regular well-settled career.

Ratings: 3 stars


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