GULLAK REVIEW: MEMOIRS OF A PIGGY BANK

GULLAK REVIEW: MEMOIRS OF A PIGGY BANK

Every object in ‘Gullak’ plays a role in annoying the Mishra family which; be it the old pump that’s out of order, or the neighbour’s rusty gate kept on the roof of the house. ‘Gullak’ tells the story of every Indian middle-class family, consisting of a homemaker, a government-employed father, a bodybuilder brother and the intelligent but dim-witted younger brother. Everything about ‘Gullak’ reflects the middle-class nature of a random small-town household in India. While women may call it good housekeeping, the men may term the same responsibilities as fiscal deficit. Directed by Amrit Raj Gupta and written by Nikhil Vijay, the show is centred around a bickering family, each of whom gets annoyed by the look of the old and rusting house, that’s where the humour rests in this TVF web series. The narrator happens to be an earthen piggy bank, who records every moment of dispute. ‘Gullak’ explores the beauty of mediocrity with strong doses of realism. The older son Annu (Vaibhav Raj Gupta) is 22 unemployed and fails to crack SSC, younger son Aman (Harsh Mayar) is a school going child. Despite being the younger child, he happens to be the ray of hope for the family. As a sibling, he alternates between being his elder brother’s confidante and arch-enemy. The members of the Mishra family aren’t familiar with the concept of low volumes, especially when it comes to addressing each other. Hence everything, even compliments sound like complaints. Throughout six episodes, there aren’t any high stakes or life-changing dramatic events, but amidst its middle-class nosiness, the series tells the summary of any middle-class family anywhere in India. The moments of harmony too arrive from the simplest of gestures- giving the sons an extra pocket money of Rs 40, buying an ice cream after dinner, or parents comforting their elder son that they have watched ‘3 Idiots’ and ‘Secret Superstar’, hence if they have any passion for guitar, they may pursue that too. The charm of ‘Gullak’ lied in its ability to address complex issues in a simple manner. Rating: 3.5/5


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