Inside Edge Season 2 Review – The Inside of Cricketing Leagues

Inside Edge Season 2 Review – The Inside of Cricketing Leagues

As a movie buff, I have never found something that normally disinterests me; so compelling! Cricket, as have mentioned in the previews, is religion in India. It is a game that has the potential to create some eye-catching numbers that can raise one's brow! 

When Karan Anshuman created Inside Edge one, he didn’t know what was he in for! The turn out was surprisingly good! Perhaps this was one of the one Indian shows that got nominated at the Emmy awards in 2018! After crossing this little milestone, the team got back together once again to deliver its viewers to a riveting creation that simply goes beyond bounds. We have none other that Akash Bhatia, and Gurmeet Singh to credit for the excellent direction. 

Inside Edge 2 is where so many aspects of the very making of a cricketing league comes to the fore; not to forget the very dark ones too. The shot opens at the office of an international news agency, trying to get Bhaisaab’s (Aamir Bashir) interview. The scene gives viewers an idea of the kind of hold that he has on the PPL, and how he can advantageously manoeuvre the teams, under the umbrella of ‘transparency’. By his side he has the actress Zarina (Richa Chadda) who ably uses her collected self to drive the business in a politically correct manner. Zarina plays mentor to Mantra (Sapna Pabbi), Bhaisaahab’s daughter, in a team that is captained by the hotheaded and arrogant Vayu (Tanju Virwani). 

While this is happening, on one hand, there is Arvind Vashisht (Angad Bedi) makes a comeback in the PPL. Money doesn’t tickle the man, but motives do! The reason for Arvind’s comeback is simple. He is given the most irresistible offer of getting a certain person caught by the cops. 

Vikrant Dhawan (Vivek Oberoi) is alive and ticking, and is a face behind, an upcoming team headed by Ayesha Diwan (FloraSaini). He uses tact to get back into the game, but his reasons are simply to avenge Bhaisaab. 

What is liked about the series is, that there is something or the other that is constantly happening from time to time. There is not a dull moment, and no way at which one can loose thread of the plot. The cricketing scenes are real! Which renders extra brownie points to the plot. Business, politics, and the dark side of an untold cold war come alive at the auction. The auction served as a perfect hot-bed to allow the dark side of the game to unfold. Each character has been thoughtfully cast and plays a part convincingly enough to add the required dimension to the plot. The production is bang on! It has toured viewers through the entire 20/20 league process including the minor details of the auction just as well! The season gets more exciting not only because of the politics that get involved in the making of the game, but it also gets exciting because of the game. With every six that is hit, and every ball that has been thrown you’ll find yourself keenly waiting with baited breath, waiting to know of what happens next! The characters, who were simply introduced in season one, seem to evolve organically with season 2. There is a stayed reason behind everything that is happening in season two. Yes, there are loose ends to the season, just as they were in season one, but these loose ends simply add to the beauty of the plot. Prashant Kanaujia’s (Siddhant Chaturvedi) performance had hit the hammer on the nail. The famed gully boy has given us just one more dimension of his stellar performance through the part he plays in the series. Sayani Gupta has admittedly stated, that she has not much insight in the world of cricket, however, she plays the part of the analyst undeniably well. It is interesting to catch her bagging the quiet victory moments at the auction as she thinks she’s played up Arvind. 

Sapna Pabbi has acted well, but her part could have evolved more convincingly for being ‘Bhaisaabh’s’ daughter. However, her role balances the plot well, keeping things on an even keel.  

Rating: 4.5/5


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