Ragnarok Review - Average Teen End-of-The-World Drama

Ragnarok Review - Average Teen End-of-The-World Drama

When you read the name Ragnarok, people think of the ridiculous film Thor: Ragnarok. But this Netflix show has got nothing to do with it. But Ragnarok is a Nordic tale that talks about the end of the world.

Netflix’s newest series, Ragnarok is a six-part Scandinavian drama about angsty teenagers in a small town who just might have unwittingly stumbled into the apocalyptic battle between gods and giants. The show is set in the small town of Edda, a city that legends claim was the battleground between the gods and the giants long ago. But nowadays the effects of climate change are causing trouble in the otherwise tranquil town, causing the seasons to be out of whack and glaciers to melt. When a pair of brothers, Magne and Laurits, arrives in town, the elders become obsessed with them.

What the Norwegian drama lacks in witchcraft it more than makes up for in mythological beings, specifically gods and giants. Yeah, this might just be a show about Thor, Loki, Odin, and all the rest of the Norse pantheon. If you like your teen drama with a bit of Viking mythology mixed in, or you like your Viking mythology drama to come in the form of an angsty, teen coming-of-age story, then you would enjoy binge-watching Ragnarok. Seriously, though, Adam Price (Borgen) has taken the story of Ragnarok, or the end of the world, and put in in an interesting context. Can Magne, this awkward, tall, dyslexic, considerate demeanour save the world against some formidable enemies? And how is Magne going to handle his newfound power?

However, the characters are flimsily explained in the show. Also, the show doesn't have a matching style with the subject matter. The show has some aspects which will remind you of shows from the 90s and the narrative alternates between campy, funny and roary. By the end of season 1, it appears that the script is bogged down and the viewers wish that Ragnarok would buck up and solve the central theme (conflict). The show, even though is 6 episodes long, just feel like a 2-hour movie plot gone way past its runtime. There isn't much to explore in season 2 if ever this show gets renewed for another season.

Rating 2.5/5


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