Skylines Review: Loses focus with unnecessary plots and sub-plots

Skylines Review: Loses focus with unnecessary plots and sub-plots

When Momo and Jinn get up on the stage at a hip-hop club in Frankfurt, to perform as Jinn and Tonik (Momo adopts the stage name Tonik), they manage to impress some of the owners of a large music company. After their performance, Semir who is a top executive for Skyline Records, one of the largest hip hop labels in Germany makes an appointment with Jinn alone and tells him to bring his drum machine. After hearing his music, Semir influences Jinn to find a better companion, thereby suggesting that he should dump Momo. Meanwhile, Thorsten an informant of Frankfurt police detective Sara secretly arranges a rendezvous with Sara to give her information on a large organised crime figure, Kelmendi. After receiving the necessary information Sara gets abducted by a pair on a motorcycle who takes her to Albanian mob. Skyline has a team of ambitious writers who find a logical way to connect various separate stories together. The first episode struggles to establish characters associated with the series, however, from the second episode onwards, the series picks up the pace. Skyline may have the elements required to get the attention of the Emmy Awards team, nevertheless, they have too many plots and sub-plots within six episodes which make us lose focus. There are a few unnecessarily details and conversations between characters which serve no purpose to the ultimate motive of the story. For example, amidst work, Sara is worried about her daughter who has lost her appetite, and this only acts as a distraction not just for Sara but even for the audience to understand why and how is that part of the plot-relevant. Despite watching every episode one after another, almost without a break most of my time went behind trying to remember what was this character’s story again? Amidst all the loopholes, Sara the character managed to stand out. In future, (or even now maybe) she may stand as an example as to what real feminism means. It isn’t only about availing the same power which men have possessed for years, but also about taking the responsibilities that come with being an independent, intelligent detective. It felt nice to see a lady detective after Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code. Maybe that’s something Hollywood can adopt. Ratings: 3 stars.


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